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Email Marketing – Write Stories not Emails

Email Marketing – Write Stories not Emails

As we go deeper and deeper into the digital age I have found that it becomes more important than ever to address your expressions through email, messenger, skype and various other written forms of communication.

 

But how can we do this? (I thought with a puzzled look on my face)

 

In my opinion we need to go back to primary school and what we learnt when writing a short story. To be honest I am one of those people that always thought school was a little useless. Good in theory but out in the real world the theory somewhat wasn’t real. I felt I learnt more on the job. But now I am not so sure (big smile on my face).

 

These days I construct and interact over emails as if I am writing a short story to the other person. With the use of emoji’s these days my emails can get pretty creative (insert crazy dancing emoji lol)

 

I follow the three basic points of view when writing – First, Second and Third Person

 

First, Second and Third person refers to a personal pronoun. Each “person” in a story can have a different perspective or “point of view” which has helped me not only get my readers excited, but enabled me to write very direct without coming across outside of my intention – as they say “there is more than one way to skin a cat”.

 

CRASH COURSE (As he stood up in his distinct teachers outfit, he reminded me of my 5th grade teacher)

 

First Person – Is written from your own Point of View (POV). I feel, I think, I smiled, I laughed. And also has a plural being “we”. We discussed, We joked, We celebrated.

 

Second Person – Is written from your readers POV. You, Your and Yours are the common pronouns. You will feel, Your results, success will be Yours.

 

Third Person – Most commonly used in fictional writing, it is important to remember if you are going to write in third person that you keep it consistent. He smiled, She laughed, scratched His head.

 

When deciding which POV to use to bring emotion and feeling into your literature it is very important to understand your end reader. For example if I was writing to someone that was very open, direct and visual I would be tempted to use first and second POV. Otherwise third person can assist approaching a reader who is less physical in there domineer.

 

How we usually write an email:

 

Hi John,

 

I hope this email finds you well.

 

How are you progressing with your evaluation of our services?

 

I can’t wait to start working with you, so please do not hesitate to call me for any additional information you might require.

 

Regards

Brian

 

  • How did you interpret this email, does it sound like an email from an impersonal sales guy?

 

Example 1: (First and Second Person)

 

Hi John (I said smiling),

 

I hope this email finds you well.

 

How are you progressing with your evaluation of our services? (I raised my eyebrows with a smile and tilted my head ever so slightly)

 

I can’t wait to start working with you, so please do not hesitate to call me for any additional information you might require. (As we shake hands)

 

Regards

Brian

 

Example 2: (Third Person)

 

Hi John (he said with a smile on his face)

 

I hope this email finds you well.

 

How are you progressing with your evaluation of our services? (He asks with a soft questioning tone)

 

I can’t wait to start working with you (he smiles), so please do not hesitate to call me for any additional information you might require. (As they shook hands)

 

Regards

Brian

 

  • What are your thoughts?

 

So there you have it, do you think adding little descriptive narratives in your correspondence might assist in making the tone and context of your written conversations clearer. For me the answer is YES (He said very excited with a smile from ear to ear).

 

We would love to read what your doing so please give us a call, OR SEND US A STORY.

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